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Conditions

Disseminated Superficial Actinic Porokeratosis

DSAP on legs

Disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis (DSAP) is a rare inherited skin condition that causes dry, itchy lesions on the arms and legs. However, some people can develop DSAP as a result of immunity problems. It usually affects fair skinned people over the age of 35, and it is more common in women than in men. About half of the children of those with DSAP will have the condition, but accumulated sun exposure is needed to bring this tendency out.

The lesions usually begin as a small brownish-red spot which can expand to a diameter of 10mm. No sweating occurs in these lesions, but exposure to the sun can cause these to itch. DSAP usually affects the lower arms and legs, but in rare cases it can also affect the forehead and cheeks.

The best way to stop the lesions from growing is to avoid exposure to the sun. This is especially important as whilst development of skin cancer in people with DSAP is uncommon, many patients with the condition have already experienced a significant exposure to the sun so it is important to have yearly check-ups on the lesions.

Unfortunately treatment of DSAP does not usually improve the condition dramatically. Creams can offer some slight help with cryotherapy also often being prescribed. Cyrotherapy is when the lesions are removed by freezing them using liquid nitrogen, but this can sometimes lead to areas of hypo-pigmentation. Other treatments include ointments and oral medicines.. However, some people can develop DSAP as a result of immunity problems. It usually affects fair skinned people over the age of 35, and it is more common in women than in men. About half of the children of those with DSAP will have the condition, but accumulated sun exposure is needed to bring this tendency out.

The lesions usually begin as a small brownish-red spot which can expand to a diameter of 10mm. No sweating occurs in these lesions, but exposure to the sun can cause these to itch. DSAP usually affects the lower arms and legs, but in rare cases it can also affect the forehead and cheeks.

The best way to stop the lesions from growing is to avoid exposure to the sun. This is especially important as whilst development of skin cancer in people with DSAP is uncommon, many patients with the condition have already experienced a significant exposure to the sun so it is important to have yearly check-ups on the lesions.

Unfortunately treatment of DSAP does not usually improve the condition dramatically. Creams can offer some slight help with cryotherapy also often being prescribed. Cyrotherapy is when the lesions are removed by freezing them using liquid nitrogen, but this can sometimes lead to areas of hypo-pigmentation. Other treatments include ointments and oral medicines.

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Hello, I am 42 years old, have had DSAP for several years yet only recently diagnosed. Lemons have a bleaching agent which lightens the dark brown spots to a light brown. However, this did not affect the red spots. I have been using apple cider vinegar as an all over body topical so I'm curious to see 6 month results.





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I have been fighting this condition for over 30 years. I am 64 today. The best treatment for me has been freezing each place. The scaring is bad and they take up to a year to disappear. Then back to the doctor to have more frozen! The creams would not touch the leisions. I guess the skin is too tough. My mother has this condition but not my sister. I am very fair skinned and blue eyed. I grew up in the 50's going to the lake and beach with little to no protection. The sun was suppose to be so good for us! On top of it all I am vitamin D deficient! You need sun exposure for proper vit. D absorption but then sun is bad for me! Go figure! So I take supplements of D3. My daughter in law is a determatologist and headed to Florida for her residency. I told her to keep my condition in mind as she learns more about the skin. I bet lots of folks have this condition in Florida. If someone has some better suggestions for this condition I would love to know what you are doing!!





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Anyone know of a good Doctor in Northeast Philadelphia...near Fox Chase Hospital





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I have had DSAP for 20-30 years. While I have found no treatment that is helpful , I am very pleased with Dermablend Leg and Body Cover. It is designed to cover scars, comes in different skin tones,and does not come off even in water unless you use soap. I cover my arms and legs with it and can wear whatever I want. It has been a blessing. The phone number on my tube is 1-877-900-6700.I am sure you can find it on the web. I have also found it in department stores with cosmetic sections.





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Thank you for information on Dermablend.I was just diagnosed with DSAP,after having it for 5 years,this last dermatologist finally told me what it is.She prescribed a cream,that I haven't gotten yet,waiting for it to be approved.She said it won't take it away, but it might make it a little bit unnoticeable.When I find out the name of it, I will let you know.Going to order Dermablend right now.What color did you get,I am very fair skinned.

I'm a 52 yr old, fair skinned, blue eyed, female. My mother had and older brother has DSAP as well. I hate it and dread summer and warm weather. My lesions are much redder than my brother's. Neither of us have had much luck with any treatments. The shortest sleeves I wear are 3/4 and only capris on occasion. It is embarrassing when people ask "What's wrong with your arms?". Even medical professionals. I know they aren't intentionally being hurtful but it is embarrassing. No one I know personally (other than family) has it.





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I have found that it is helpful to bathe in Epsom salts. It reduces the swelling and takes out some of the redness. Not a cure but it is an inexpensive treatment that seems to be very effective. Twice a week seems to be the magic number for me. I hate it too. So frustrating and embarrassing.

I am 40 years old living in Florida and have a pool business. I am diagnosed with DSAP a few years ago. I have it on my arm, legs and even in my face. I am not covering my arm and legs and being outside all day long. I am using spf 30 and Carotenoid complex plus Heliocare pills (one daily). Using these pills helped me a lot.

My spots seemed to get worse after I was pregnant. Either that or bc of my age. I am 44 and my girl is 6. I also bike a lot so I am sure the sun exposure had something to do with it. My dad and both his sisters have it. My dad has seen improvement with daily application of vitamin E oil. I am trying coconut oil application nightly to see if I can get them to fade.





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Wondering..... I have DSAP... My blood type is AB+ Anyone else?





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My blood type is O+; don't think DSAP is related to blood types. Most recent studies point to a genetic change.

My blood type is O+; don't think DSAP is related to blood types. Most recent studies point to a genetic change.

I am a 55 yr old female, who has just been diagnosed with with DSAP, however, i have had it for years. It has just got very severe and is mostly on my arms and neck, chest area. I will see Dermatologist in a couple of days and I hope he does something! I cannot stand the itch and burn. It has been aggravated by me taking "Plaquenil" for Systemic Lupus Erythematosis and today i have had a severe photophobic reaction and my whole body was searing hot so thats the end of Plaquenil - i have ceased it. The treatment i have tried is Liquid Nitrogen burning over the years and was helpful, however, new patches appear. I will continue with more Liquid Nitrogen if the Dermatologist does nothing. Aloevera straight from the plant seems a little soothing. Cortisone creams seem useless. I apply an ice pack when irritable. I am taking Phenergan at present but it wipes me out all day. Other antihistamines i have found useless. When i was younger i was outside a lot in the sun without protection, fishing, swimming and horse-riding. From now on i have to start protecting myself and i like gardening so its going to be hard. I intent to look for everything i can find that relieves them including laser. I will post here anything i find useful for us all to try. I now remember that my Mum had a few red spots that she said was really itchy so i bet she had this too. I hope we can find something real soon!!!





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I have had this condition for 19 years now and I HATE IT!!!!! I am totally embarassed to even wear capris. I try to cover them up or at least make them less obvious with powder make-up. Has anyone found anything that will disguise them? I am getting ready to try my first treatment of PDT therapy and pray that it works without significant side effects like scars. Has anyone tried this on your arms or legs?





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Would be interesting to know how that works for you. For me, it did not improve my condition at all.

My sister and I both in our 60's have suffered with this condition for over 10 years. Our paternal Grandmother and Aunt had the disease, both had never uncovered in the sun. Our Aunt's weeping open lesions led to all sorts of treatments, one being maggots that ate the dead skin, her condition was very severe indeed and needed daily attention from age 70 until she passed away at age 89. I sincerely hope that my sister and I do not inherit this very aggressive severe form of the condition.





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It looks like no one else has asked this question, so please fill in the rest of your details below.





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