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Conditions

Dyspraxia

Dyspraxia

Dyspraxia is also known as developmental co-ordination disorder, and is the partial loss of the ability to co-ordinate and perform movements and gestures. This often leads to clumsiness, lack of coordination and problems with language, perception and thought. Symptoms are normally noticeable from an early age where it takes longer for a sufferer to roll over, sit, crawl, stand, walk, speak and toilet train. However, dyspraxia can affect people in lots of different ways, with a sufferer being able to perform a task one day and the not be able to the next. While dyspraxia does not affect how intelligent a child is, it does affect a child’s ability to learn and often needs extra help at school.

A recent study suggested that only 2 in every one hundred children have the condition with boys being four times more likely to have dyspraxia than girls. But the condition can run in the family and develop alongside existing conditions such as ADHD and dyslexia.

The cause of dyspraxia is unknown, but recent medical thought suggests that the condition may be caused by motor neurones in the brain not developing properly. Motor neurones are nerve cells that pass signals from the brain to the muscles to control movement. There has also been links between dyspraxia and premature birth, being born with a low birth weight and maternal smoking, drug use and alcohol use. It can additionally be acquired as a result of brain damage, for instance from a stroke or a head injury.

There is no cure for dyspraxia but there are therapies available that can help control the symptoms such as speech and language therapy, physiotherapy and occupational therapy to allow the sufferer to remain independent. Perceptual motor training may also be prescribed. This is a series of exercises that cover language skills, hearing and listening skills and movement skills to help control the symptoms of dyspraxia. A clinical psychologist and educational psychologist can help with the emotional and psychological impact of living with the condition. However, for children displaying mild symptoms the condition can disappear as they reach adulthood. This is still quiet rare though, with 9 out of 10 children continuing to have difficulties as a teenager and into adulthood.

There are various online tests available to help give you an indication of whether you might have dyspraxia. One of these is provided by Dore and is available below.

Take the Dore Dyspraxia test >

Find out more about Dyspraxia from The Dyspraxia Foundation >

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I think my son may be dyspraxic, the school advised seeing a doctor to have him referred for tests, this was over a year ago. We got a letter about a year ago suing the dept no longer dealt with this and I subsequently saw the doctor who referred him to another dept. I saw the doctor last week and chased it up and this doc said that it wasn't medical so the NHS don't do it any more it beef to go through the school but the school day it goes through doc. What should be my next step? My son is 12 Moore and getting near exams, we are having behaviour problems and if he needs the help, I would like him to have the help. Thank you for any info. We can't afford to test him privately.





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Hiya my daughter is 16 and I ashamed to say that I have never heard of dyspraxia until I rang her school up asking if she is entitled to extra time for her exams as I have maths tutor to help her at home as she was badly behind and he suggested to try and get extra time for her. Anna was seen when she was in primary 2 and was told that she might be slightly dyslexic so she hot 1 to 1 help in all of her primary school but when she went to secondary she got nothing and her English was her best subject so I assumed that she didn't need any more help. I got talking to the special needs teacher and told him that Anna has only learned to put her hair up in a ponytail last month and that she still can't tie her laces and holds her cup where I always think she is going to spill it. She also can't tell the time on a round clock just digital. It took her ages to learn to ride a bike when she was younger and could never button her shirt properly. I'm assuming after being told that she has dyspraxia but I was wondering if a fit could have brought this on as she took a fit when she was 1 and was in it for 35mins which they were concerned about but the ecg (I think that was the name of the test where they put wires on her head) came back normal??





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Hiya Lucy Thank you for replying to my message and I will def pass on the hairbrush and tieing laces poem to my daughter. She had a meeting today with the special needs teacher and she was saying that he was throwing pens at her! Lol he done lots of different tests on the computer aswell so I am waiting for him to ring me and let me know the outcome. I think it's terrible the amount of people who have never heard of it including myself. They should educate people abit more about it then maybe you's would find out early enough and get the best help that's available to help you with it. Would you be behind in your maths aswell?

Hi again (it's Lucy again) glad you found the info helpful :) yes I m disgusted with the way dyspraxia is treat. The SEN's are terrible and will not bother to let you know unless you actively nag them for info sorry to be blunt but that's the way I am and probably the best way to help you. There are people who don't want much recognition for dyspraxia as it can be "expensive" to treat. I was behind in my maths very behind but I did walk away with a C (which is the required grade for getting a job so it is possible) it took me hours of work and your daughter will probably have to go through the same. If you ever get the opportunity to speak with her maths tutor again ask him what she struggles with or more importantly how she struggles (does she get the sum right and the answer wrong.)also ask him if she struggles with anything in an "odd" way. For example I would get the answer right sometimes but not the method. It might be worth going back to basics so just after primary beginning of highschool or secondary if your in America as she will have been less developed then than she is now so she will have struggled to grasp concepts more then than she will now even though it is harder she is essentially more capable (does that make sense??? I hope so)it is likely she will always struggle with the shapes side of maths so focus on getting her grades from other aspects such as addition etc. The biggest thing with maths is reppition everything must be repeated every day even if it is tedious and she knows it in her sleep trust me I was so over maths by the time I got my C but believe me it's worth it... as for getting help:1 apply for a statement of Special Needs or an SEN statement no matter what they tell you. 2. See a education phycologist or ed physkes okay I can't spell but you get the idea. 3. See an oppucational and physical therapist they can help you have a chat with them about the co-op approach this will help your daughter with her condition on a whole 4. do not let them do "half a test" they will try and suggest it I wouldn't. 5. Don't be surprised if the NHS are uncaring, defensive, or laugh at you it's gonna take some time and polite arguing from you. talk to your daughter first warn her not to look at you for answers it may seem as though you're influencing her when really she's just nervous I was 11 so I got caught out with that one. If it helps I got into a so called good college and managed to secure plenty of work experience for myself. BTW see if your school will let her swap onto the OCR welsh exam board (I'm guessing she's with Edexcel) welsh exam boards papers can be provided in English and are much easier to read and understand as I don't know if you are aware but our country is doing subject merging which is where they put complicated words in a maths exam to try and incopriate English the welsh don't have to follow this rule thank god for loopholes. Remember that if your daughter doesn't pass hope is not lost although I wouldn't recommend telling her just yet she might lose some motivation she can do a Level 2 functional skills in maths later which is equivalent to GCSE. Make sure your daughter takes BTEC where possible it helps :). Hope this is helpful sorry I rambled on a bit there any other questions do ask I will try and help.

If your son, ticks 2 out of the 3 boxes, he should get a diagnosis of aspergers traits/borderline asperger syndrome or an autistic spectrum disorder, but borderline. If the main condition is dyspraxia, they may or may not have aspergers traits.





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My daughter was diagnosed as Dyspraxic at 7, she is now 19. She is realy struggling now to get a job. I'm helping her all I can but her bit of confidence she had built up through college has now gone due to so many job knockbacks.





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Don't worry. Keep reinforceing how difficult the job market is at the moment, reassure her that it's not because of her need. Do stiffest she gets a part time voluntary job which may restore some confidence in the meantime. Good luck to her

She has done a 6 week stint in Cancer Reasearch to try and boost her confidence, she learnt till operation and handling money etc. All that is on her cv. I am going with her today to our local Employment Support and Training, i didnt know of that until last week. Wouldnt you think the job centre would put you in touch with this support. I just found it by chance.Its self funded so we have to apply for a Personal Allowence via a Social Worker. So fingers crossed.

My daughter is 17,her college seems to think she has some form of dyspraxia, she had a test for dyslexia at college, they said she is more likely to have dyscalculia because she has always struggled with her maths, all through primary and secondary, I can't understand how they didn't pick up on this,I spoke to someone where I work in a primary school who deals with children with learning difficulties, I explained all her symptoms, she said for me to look more into dyspraxia, my daughters tutor has said that she has no organisation and always gets held back with her work, she is very untidy, forgetful which causes her to stress, when out and about she Is alway apologising to people because she's bumping into them, or gets in their way, she walks with her head down a lot and seems to be flat footed, if there is anyone who can give me some ideas I would be truly grateful.





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My age is 35 I am a man with Dyspraxia. Over the last ten years mam and dad and I go to Amsterdam because I do races every year. Over the few years I try to win mam over to let me go to Amsterdam on my own. Last week I asked her she sad no. We had a big agurment. I have to go with her to keep the pace. She sad i will never let you go on you own You have dyspraxia I am not letting you go on you own not next year or 20years. How to win her over. Its only dyspraxia at the end of the noting seriers . If I keep at her it only cause a big agurment





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I'm a medical professional in my mid 30's and when I look back at my childhood I realise that I had a lot of symptoms of dyspraxia and suspect that I could be diagnosed as such. Poor social skills or developing late with peer relationships, terrible at PE or gym and slow with grasping sequence. Often I found I had to study harder, longer and take extra effort to be on par with colleagues as concepts often took longer to grasp. Now, later on in life I have worked hard to manage this and no longer carry this on as an issue. Dyspraxia is something that is truly under recognised and I'm grateful to parents for bringing this to light. I'm not keen on the label of dyspraxia as a disability as I do not feel less than and I continue to make genuine positive changes in peoples live. The one size fits all approach to schooling (or even healthcare!) doesn't always work and a different method of processing information could potentially open up new methods of thought.





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I almost didn't post in this forum, inner sensible voice suitably gagged, here goes... I am in my 30's and halfway through second year of a four year MEng in mechanical engineering, recently assessed with severe tendencies towards dyspraxia, I am in the process of figuring out how to complete the path I chose. My first mistake was to disclose to a group of my peers that I had an SLD, namely: dyspraxia. Instead of supporting my contribution to the group, I've been ostracised and have become the butt of several private jokes (confirmed by another member's slip of the tongue at the end of a recent meeting). I feel alone, paranoid, insecure and, most of all, STUPID Listing this DISABILITY as a 'Condition' on the embarrassing bodies website is NOT conducive to public awareness and/or understanding of a life long specific learning disability. I have been embarrassing myself my whole life and I do not need anyone/thing misinforming my colleagues and peers thus making coping with my life even harder than it was already. PLEASE REMOVE THE DYSPRAXIA PAGE FROM EMBARRASING BODIES - LISTING IT HERE MAKES IT EMBARRASING!!





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P.S. I notice you don't have dyslexia listed as a condition on embarrassing bodies; is there any reason why not?

Hi Cath, I understand how you feel and I agree to a point. I am sorry you are being treated so poorly by your peers and I can completely relate to that. Its not a difficultly people take seriously because it's an invisible, one to a degree. Or if you do show signs people just think you are weird, awkward and stupid. I am also 30 turning 31 this Sunday and having dyspraxia also dyslexia, I find as I am getting older I find things getting worse. I am not sure if you do but I struggle with just walking, I am constantly thinking about my steps. As my balance and co ordination can be completely off sometimes - it doesn't happen everyday. The reason why I don't agree fully with your comment is due to the fact when I saw it was on embarrassing bodies, I felt a sigh of relief because that is how I feel, embarrassed! And I would hope if people knew that's how I feel about it they will be more inclined to be more understanding. That maybe a tall order but it's how I felt. But I respect your comments and they may have to reconsider having this on here.

Well said I'm 16 my parents are clueless as to what it is I tend to forget things so I have to help myself I also lose things i didn't do well in school I struggle to have convosations its not nice to live with I was diagosed when I was 10 :(

Hi Really need some advice I'm 53 and just recently went for a job The job entailed doing restraint training I found this really different to do Consequence of this I had to leave I have always known I have difficulty with With putting things into sequence and had a nightmare learning at school Would I be able to get a assessment from my Doctor Thank you





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Firstly Dyspraxia is not embarrassing. For many adults who have it they have faced years of working harder than others to achieve their goals this makes their success awesome not embarrassing. Secondly to the person above, Dyspraxia is not on the autism spectrum. Many people on that spectrum also have Dyspraxia but not all Dyspraxics are autistic.





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It looks like no one else has asked this question, so please fill in the rest of your details below.





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