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Conditions

Dyspraxia

Dyspraxia

Dyspraxia is also known as developmental co-ordination disorder, and is the partial loss of the ability to co-ordinate and perform movements and gestures. This often leads to clumsiness, lack of coordination and problems with language, perception and thought. Symptoms are normally noticeable from an early age where it takes longer for a sufferer to roll over, sit, crawl, stand, walk, speak and toilet train. However, dyspraxia can affect people in lots of different ways, with a sufferer being able to perform a task one day and the not be able to the next. While dyspraxia does not affect how intelligent a child is, it does affect a child’s ability to learn and often needs extra help at school.

A recent study suggested that only 2 in every one hundred children have the condition with boys being four times more likely to have dyspraxia than girls. But the condition can run in the family and develop alongside existing conditions such as ADHD and dyslexia.

The cause of dyspraxia is unknown, but recent medical thought suggests that the condition may be caused by motor neurones in the brain not developing properly. Motor neurones are nerve cells that pass signals from the brain to the muscles to control movement. There has also been links between dyspraxia and premature birth, being born with a low birth weight and maternal smoking, drug use and alcohol use. It can additionally be acquired as a result of brain damage, for instance from a stroke or a head injury.

There is no cure for dyspraxia but there are therapies available that can help control the symptoms such as speech and language therapy, physiotherapy and occupational therapy to allow the sufferer to remain independent. Perceptual motor training may also be prescribed. This is a series of exercises that cover language skills, hearing and listening skills and movement skills to help control the symptoms of dyspraxia. A clinical psychologist and educational psychologist can help with the emotional and psychological impact of living with the condition. However, for children displaying mild symptoms the condition can disappear as they reach adulthood. This is still quiet rare though, with 9 out of 10 children continuing to have difficulties as a teenager and into adulthood.

There are various online tests available to help give you an indication of whether you might have dyspraxia. One of these is provided by Dore and is available below.

Take the Dore Dyspraxia test >

Find out more about Dyspraxia from The Dyspraxia Foundation >

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My daughter is 17,her college seems to think she has some form of dyspraxia, she had a test for dyslexia at college, they said she is more likely to have dyscalculia because she has always struggled with her maths, all through primary and secondary, I can't understand how they didn't pick up on this,I spoke to someone where I work in a primary school who deals with children with learning difficulties, I explained all her symptoms, she said for me to look more into dyspraxia, my daughters tutor has said that she has no organisation and always gets held back with her work, she is very untidy, forgetful which causes her to stress, when out and about she Is alway apologising to people because she's bumping into them, or gets in their way, she walks with her head down a lot and seems to be flat footed, if there is anyone who can give me some ideas I would be truly grateful.





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My age is 35 I am a man with Dyspraxia. Over the last ten years mam and dad and I go to Amsterdam because I do races every year. Over the few years I try to win mam over to let me go to Amsterdam on my own. Last week I asked her she sad no. We had a big agurment. I have to go with her to keep the pace. She sad i will never let you go on you own You have dyspraxia I am not letting you go on you own not next year or 20years. How to win her over. Its only dyspraxia at the end of the noting seriers . If I keep at her it only cause a big agurment





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I'm a medical professional in my mid 30's and when I look back at my childhood I realise that I had a lot of symptoms of dyspraxia and suspect that I could be diagnosed as such. Poor social skills or developing late with peer relationships, terrible at PE or gym and slow with grasping sequence. Often I found I had to study harder, longer and take extra effort to be on par with colleagues as concepts often took longer to grasp. Now, later on in life I have worked hard to manage this and no longer carry this on as an issue. Dyspraxia is something that is truly under recognised and I'm grateful to parents for bringing this to light. I'm not keen on the label of dyspraxia as a disability as I do not feel less than and I continue to make genuine positive changes in peoples live. The one size fits all approach to schooling (or even healthcare!) doesn't always work and a different method of processing information could potentially open up new methods of thought.





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I almost didn't post in this forum, inner sensible voice suitably gagged, here goes... I am in my 30's and halfway through second year of a four year MEng in mechanical engineering, recently assessed with severe tendencies towards dyspraxia, I am in the process of figuring out how to complete the path I chose. My first mistake was to disclose to a group of my peers that I had an SLD, namely: dyspraxia. Instead of supporting my contribution to the group, I've been ostracised and have become the butt of several private jokes (confirmed by another member's slip of the tongue at the end of a recent meeting). I feel alone, paranoid, insecure and, most of all, STUPID Listing this DISABILITY as a 'Condition' on the embarrassing bodies website is NOT conducive to public awareness and/or understanding of a life long specific learning disability. I have been embarrassing myself my whole life and I do not need anyone/thing misinforming my colleagues and peers thus making coping with my life even harder than it was already. PLEASE REMOVE THE DYSPRAXIA PAGE FROM EMBARRASING BODIES - LISTING IT HERE MAKES IT EMBARRASING!!





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P.S. I notice you don't have dyslexia listed as a condition on embarrassing bodies; is there any reason why not?

Hi Cath, I understand how you feel and I agree to a point. I am sorry you are being treated so poorly by your peers and I can completely relate to that. Its not a difficultly people take seriously because it's an invisible, one to a degree. Or if you do show signs people just think you are weird, awkward and stupid. I am also 30 turning 31 this Sunday and having dyspraxia also dyslexia, I find as I am getting older I find things getting worse. I am not sure if you do but I struggle with just walking, I am constantly thinking about my steps. As my balance and co ordination can be completely off sometimes - it doesn't happen everyday. The reason why I don't agree fully with your comment is due to the fact when I saw it was on embarrassing bodies, I felt a sigh of relief because that is how I feel, embarrassed! And I would hope if people knew that's how I feel about it they will be more inclined to be more understanding. That maybe a tall order but it's how I felt. But I respect your comments and they may have to reconsider having this on here.

Well said I'm 16 my parents are clueless as to what it is I tend to forget things so I have to help myself I also lose things i didn't do well in school I struggle to have convosations its not nice to live with I was diagosed when I was 10 :(

Hi Really need some advice I'm 53 and just recently went for a job The job entailed doing restraint training I found this really different to do Consequence of this I had to leave I have always known I have difficulty with With putting things into sequence and had a nightmare learning at school Would I be able to get a assessment from my Doctor Thank you





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Firstly Dyspraxia is not embarrassing. For many adults who have it they have faced years of working harder than others to achieve their goals this makes their success awesome not embarrassing. Secondly to the person above, Dyspraxia is not on the autism spectrum. Many people on that spectrum also have Dyspraxia but not all Dyspraxics are autistic.





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My son has recently been diagnosed with dyspraxia at age 4. In South Africa there is hardly any support or programs for children with dyspraxia. No government or subsidised programs etc. So the cost of therapies (speech ; OT etc) are enormous. Because of the lack of programs I also had to leave my job to help my boy. So we are even worse of. Because he is Afrikaans speaking, we cannot even make use of any international programs provided for dyspraxia. Can you just imagine the challenges we are facing? Any supportive advise will be appreciated





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Its get better I have it im 21 and im dyslexic dyspraicqp and have mild aspegers it gets better you learn to deal with it let the kids be





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I have a 14 yr old son with some of the same issues. He struggles with tying shoelaces, and with woodwork etc at school. He too struggles with Lego and co-ordination. He has now started making involuntary sounds. He has never had a friend, and has never socialised with any other kids and admits he finds it difficult to mix. Since he was younger he has shown signs of dyspraxia but also Asbergers. I have always hoped he would get better as he got older, but I am now going to make an appt with GP to see if I can get him some help. I feel so guilty for not doing this sooner :-(

I have an appt with my doctor to discuss my sons issues as I believe he has dyspraxia. He is 12 and a half and I have noted around 38 different things that make my son stand out from others around him, included strugging with tying laces, very bad at maths and basic counting. He gets confused with left and right, cant tell the time very well, has no social life and no real friends, says innapropriate things and interrupts people, struggles building lego, climbing, runs flat footed (stomps) stutters, very disorganised and forgetful etc... I have been fobbed off twice already by the doctors who have previously told me there is nothing wrong with him. He is my son and I know him inside out. I feel sad that he recognises his differences and doesnt know why he is different. Has anyone else had this problem, where they are struggling for a diagnosis? :-(





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Hi, I had this very problem of not being able to get diagnosed, I eventually did at 19 but fought hard for a diagnosis for years, I suffer from the same problems your son does with tying laces etc,I would say keep trying until you find a doctor who will diagnose, I ended up being refered to kings college for an assessment and finally got diagnosed, I would try contacting them as well. I think the reason its hard to get a diagnosis is because it is a recent condition and still isnt recognised and most people see it a clumsy child. Also if your son takes his time doing things he will learn how to do them just like a normal child but maybe a bit differently and in his own way.

My advice, write every little thing down that you think is different from other children, the smallest of things can make iteasier for a proper diagnosis, my son has just been diagnosed with severe dyspraxia, autism, sseparation anxiety and sensoryprocessing disorder, he is 9 yrs old and an awesome kid.. Good luck and be prepare to battle lol x

Hi, My daughter is now 21 yrs old and despite many times trying to get help via our various doctors and a diagnosis we have not managed and struggled by. It's extremely upsetting when your a mum and you know your child is suffering with many problems to do with learning,speech,reading,writing,daily activities,clumsiness,falls,lack of friends and all the other things many other children do and enjoy daily.I have often said my daughter had some form of Autism or Aspergers and only when we lived abroad was dyscalculia ever mentioned. I firmly believe my daughter suffers from Dyspraxia and some form of Autism/Aspergers. To this day still trying to get help and a diagnosis 30/012015. written by a very concerned mum.

I'm 23 and was diagnosed with dyspraxia aged 7. Growing up was a nightmare. I had severe confidence issues and even today have never managed to make even one friend. At school P.E was a pain, I really struggled with catching, throwing etc. However I was quite an imaginative child and I excelled at essays in spite of my messy writing. As an adult, I am finding life very confusing at times.





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